Living National Treasures Of Japan (人間国宝) For Pottery

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I am not an expert in Japanese ceramics, but in order to learn more I put together this list (based on the one found here).  I tried to include a picture of the artist as well as representative works.  If you notice a mistake please let me know.

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Born 1954.  Designated in 2013 for Hakuji (白磁)

Hakuji is Japanese white porcelain originally made from a superior white-stoned clay thought to be discovered in the early 17th century at Izumiyama by Korean potter Ri Sampei.

Akihiro Maeta’s work is hand-thrown and faceted.

http://www.yufuku.net/e/artists/maeta_akihiro.html

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WwiRMqwfDsI

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Born 1935.  Designated in 2010 for Setoguro (瀬戸黒).

Setoguro is a high-fired ware that originated in the late 16th century. Black glaze is achieved by removing the iron-glazed pots from the kiln when they are red-hot (a technique called hikidashi guro).

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Born 1941.  Designated in 2007 for Seiji (Celadon).

 

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Born 1936.  Designated in 2005 for Tetsugusuri (Iron glaze, 鉄釉)

 

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Born 1936.  Designated in 2004 for Bizen-yaki

Bizen ware (備前焼) is a type of pottery most identifiable by its ironlike hardness, reddish brown color, absence of glaze (though there can be traces of molten ash looking like glaze), and markings resulting from wood-burning kiln firing.

 

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Born 1941.  Designated in 2003 for Mumyoi-yaki.

Mumyoi ware is made with red ocher clay known as “mumyoi” from Sado Island.

http://www.e-yakimono.net/guide/html/mumyoi.html

http://www.e-yakimono.net/html/ito-sekisui-v.html

 

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