National Emergency Library

Hundreds of free ceramics books & magazines you can read now!  Please spread the word to your fellow teachers, students, and pottery nerds. The amazing @internetarchive has created a National Emergency Library to enable students and the general public to lend publications for free and without a waitlist. https://archive.org/nel Just search for keywords like “ceramics”, “pottery” and “glaze”.… Continue reading National Emergency Library

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Categorized as Ceramics

Stay Home

Just moved my glaze testing studio into the garage. Feeling very lucky that I can still work during quarantine.

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Categorized as Glazes

More Tests

More tests for #theglazyproject  It’s a gamble! The Glazy Project is an effort to document hundreds of old recipes in Glazy that have no record of being tested. The old recipes in Glazy were, at some point in time, used by a potter and carefully recorded to share with others.  We should give these recipes the benefit of the… Continue reading More Tests

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Categorized as Glazes, Glazy

Classic Blue

Pantone just released its color of the year, Classic Blue. Looking for a certain color of glaze?  Just use the Glazy color picker when searching! Here’s a search for Classic Blue:  https://glazy.org/search?photo=true&base_type=460&hex_color=0f4c81

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Categorized as Glazes, Glazy

Early Glazy Prototype

Look familiar?  No, it’s not Glazy, it’s Jingdezhen 😜  Just a few samples from the glaze shops in Jingdezhen.  You can get spoiled being a ceramicist here, where amazing glazes from every dynasty in every color are available by the bucket!  Someday maybe Glazy will become a virtual Jingdezhen glaze shop!

Lipstick Purple Biaxial

“Painted” Biaxial based on Tom Coleman’s beautiful Lipstick Purple. Part of my “Painted” series of tests prepared for @northernclaycenter’s “Six McKnight Artists” exhibition.  Each row has a set Alumina level, while each column represents a specific Silica:Alumina ratio.  Coleman’s original recipe lies on the bottom row (Al2O3 0.4) between the second & third columns (Si:Al… Continue reading Lipstick Purple Biaxial

Chinese Vintage Cigarette Labels

Celebrating ancient Chinese ceramics in vintage cigarette labels: 1. “Painted Pottery” honoring neolithic pottery from the Yangshao culture. 2. Named for Jingdezhen, “Ceramic Capital”, and produced in Jiangxi. 3. “Porcelain vase” cigarettes from Hohhot in Inner Mongolia. 4. “Ancient Ceramics” with four representative types of Chinese porcelain. 5. “Ancient Pottery” from Guizhou Province. 6. “Sancai”… Continue reading Chinese Vintage Cigarette Labels

Qing Porcelain Stone Tests

These are melt tests of different types of porcelain stone from sometime at or before the Qing dynasty. Iron or blue qinghua underglaze was used to write place names and other notes on each test. Porcelain stone is an amazing material that primarily comes from a number of mines near Jingdezhen. Combining porcelain stone with… Continue reading Qing Porcelain Stone Tests

Six McKnight Artists

Exhibition Website: https://www.northernclaycenter.org/exhibition/six-mcknight-artists-5 From January to March of 2018 I had the opportunity to work at the Northern Clay Center as a McKnight Visiting Artist as well as participate with some of my pottery heroes in the wonderfully-curated “Expatriate Ceramics” exhibition. NCC is a well-oiled machine with an amazing staff. The care and attention they bring… Continue reading Six McKnight Artists

Paintings of the Traditional Porcelain Process

“Export” Art During the 18th Century, Guangdong province was the hub for trade with the West. The dialogue between Western merchants and artists with both painters and porcelain producers resulted in a unique blend of Chinese and Western styles. This blend was reflected in the painting styles for both Export Paintings as well as Export… Continue reading Paintings of the Traditional Porcelain Process

USG Plaster Slide Rule

Plaster Calculator Update:  1) Specify units in inches or centimeters, 2) Added @nbivins formula (via @jeffcampana‘s). More ideas for improvements?  Let me know in the comments! https://plaster.glazy.org/ (link in bio) Pictured here:  The original “gypsum cement & plaster VOLUME and MIX calculator” from USG with awesome 80’s graphic design. (Courtesy @earlyamericanrobotpottery)

Plaster Calculator

Calculate the amount of water and plaster you will need for various solid forms. https://plaster.glazy.org/ Bookmark this link on your phone’s browser for easy access! The code is open source and available on Github: https://github.com/derekphilipau/vue-plaster-calculator Inspired by Keith Simpson’s (@earlyamericanrobotpottery) plaster handout and the USG plaster calculator. The calculations are from USG (https://www.usg.com/), Keith Simpson… Continue reading Plaster Calculator

Koryo Celadon with Bone Ash and Manganese

Testing the effects of Bone Ash and Manganese Dioxide additions to a celadon base. Koryo Celadon #3 from Nigel Wood’s “Chinese Glazes”, “Recipe for Table 8b – Koryo celadons”. Originally tested by @macmakesflamingos. Forgot to mention: Fired to cone 10 in reduction. Grolleg porcelain body. 

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Copper Red Biaxial

Attempting a Copper Red with “normal” flux ratio of R2O:RO 0.3:0.7. (Most formulas I’ve seen have higher R2O levels of 0.4:0.6 or more.) Fixed 0.15 B2O, 0.02 SnO2, 0.01 CuO (1% Tin Oxide and 0.35% Copper Carbonate). Fired together to Orton Cone 10 in reduction starting at cone 010 with 30-minute oxidation hold at peak… Continue reading Copper Red Biaxial

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Xuande copper red

First attempt at a Xuande copper red based on analyses from Nigel Wood’s “Chinese Glazes”, “Copper in Chinese Glazes”, Table 71 “Analyses of Xuande and Yongle Jingdezhen porcelain glazes”, p 179.  Applied to Grolleg-based porcelain body, fired to Orton Cone 10 in reduction atmosphere.

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Categorized as Glazes

Reitz Purple Base Triaxial

A triaxial blend using Reitz Purple base with additions of Red Iron Oxide and Light Rutile.  Fired to Orton Cone 10 in both oxidation and reduction.  The most interesting tests are the intermediary glaze containing both iron and rutile.

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Categorized as Glazes